Julie Abrams and Associates - Occupational Therapy: Helping Children Grow and Develop
Frequently Asked Questions
 
What is occupational therapy?
Occupational therapy builds skills for the job of living.  For children, this means helping them improve fine and gross motor skills, visual perceptual skills, overall core strength and postural control, attention span, social skills, following directions, handwriting, self-care, feeding and sensory processing.  Occupational therapists work with children using meaningful and purposeful activities to help them grow, develop,  and gain independence. 
 
What is unique about your practice?
When children come to JenLo Farm for therapy, a great deal of their session is spent outside.  Goals are achieved by participating in real life activities.  For example, core strength, bilateral motor coordination, balance and sensory defensiveness can be addressed by raking hay, putting it in a wheelbarrow and pushing it to the compost pile.  By completing a variety of farm chores, kids gain independence, learn sequencing, following directions, and responsibility for other living creatures.
 
Who can benefit from occupational therapy?
Children with a variety of needs and diagnoses benefit from OT.  Some examples include:  Sensory Processing Disorder,  Autism, Down Syndrome, Fragile X, Cerebral Palsy, twice exceptional, gifted, prematurity, ADD and ADHD.
 
What is sensory processing disorder (SPD)?
Sensory processing (sometimes called "sensory integration" or SI) is the way the nervous system processes and interprets sensory information.  We are all constantly integrating sensory information, whether it is the sounds and smells of the school cafeteria or the feeling of the shirt on our back.
 
Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD, formerly known as "sensory integration dysfunction") occurs when the nervous system misinterprets various sensory stimuli.  As a result of this misinterpretation, individuals with SPD can have difficulties with everyday activities.  Behavior problems, social challenges, anxiety, difficulty in school, poor motor skills, etc. are all characteristics of children with SPD.
 
Do you have articles about Jen-Lo Farm?
Yes, indeed.  Please click the links below.


Where did you get the name Jen-Lo Farm?
Lois Hickman, MS, OTR is the founder of the farm.  She has over thirty years of experience as an occupational therapist.  Lois and her daughter, Jennifer live there and take care of the animals and the gardens together.  Put their names together and you get Jen-Lo.

 
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